Keep Reaching For Your Financial Goals

KEEP REACHING FOR YOUR FINANCIAL GOALS.
Few things are able to motivate us like self-improvement. However, despite initial enthusiasm, our personal goals can seem like impossible challenges after just a few days.

Financial goals are particularly difficult to accomplish. Spending money is inherent in modern life, and financial goals can easily get lost in other money issues. What’s worse, the feedback from financial goals is blunt and immediate. As soon as we get started, our finances begin to define our success with clear positives and negatives. Financial goals also remember our mistakes. A one-time slip-up, like a costly purchase, can disrupt progress towards a goal for months or even years.

The success of a goal often comes down to the strategies and tools used to support them. However, valuable techniques are often abandoned as soon as a little bit of progress is made. Use some of these steps to help make your goal a reality:

Be reasonable – It’s always important to be realistic; In regards to financial goals, it is essential. If you make your goals too extreme, you set yourself up for frustration and disappointment. It’s better to have an attainable goal you can more easily reach than an impossible goal that discourages you and could lead to giving up on the goal entirely. Once you have a little success, you can raise your expectations.

Set solid milestones and celebrate them – Milestones are a great way to track progress and boost your morale, but you need to make them an important part of your life. If you’ve made it halfway to your goal, celebrate in some way and give yourself a taste of what success will feel like. Stay positive; milestones are meant to show you how far you’ve come, not how far you still have to go.

Find some accountability – Telling someone else about your goals and having them check up on your progress can massively boost your discipline. Even if your confidant only asks for occasional updates, being accountable for your actions can provide a lot of encouragement to stick to your plan.

Automate what you can – Constantly trying to make the right choices can wear down your motivation. Automating your target savings or debt payments can help you avoid the potential mistakes and will allow you to save your energy for other challenges.

Break and build habits – It’s often said that it takes 21 days to break a habit or build a new one. While the psychology isn’t exact, it’s clear that our habits are a lot easier to change than we usually imagine. If you can force yourself to stick to a plan for just three weeks, progress should become much easier.

Limit the number of goals – Reaching goals can be difficult, so don’t try to accomplish several of them simultaneously. Only start one or two financial goals at a time and don’t create new ones until your current efforts have become second nature.

Bend so that you don’t break – Interruptions are inevitable. Much like setting a realistic goal, it’s important to have realistic expectations for your progress. If there is an unavoidable problem, adjust your goal accordingly and keep trying. Don’t give up on a goal just because of an unplanned setback.

Reaching goals is a skill that takes practice and experience. In accomplishing one goal, you learn which strategies work best with your personality. Even when you fail, you’ve learned more about what it takes to reach success. The important thing is being willing to try again.

Remember that past performance may not indicate future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, strategy, or product referenced directly or indirectly in this newsletter will be profitable, equal any corresponding historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. You should not assume that any information contained in this newsletter serves as the receipt of personalized investment advice. If a reader has questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed to their individual situation, they are encouraged to consult with a professional adviser.

This article was written by Advicent Solutions, an entity unrelated to Guidestream Financial, Inc.. The information contained in this article is not intended to be tax, investment, or legal advice, and it may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any tax penalties. Guidestream Financial, Inc. does not provide tax or legal advice. You are encouraged to consult with your tax advisor or attorney regarding specific tax issues. © 2014-2017 Advicent Solutions. All rights reserved.

Retiring Early

It seems as if there has been increasing coverage in the media recently regarding early retirement. The prospect of having an extended retirement is incredibly appealing for many Americans.—However, with pensions becoming increasingly less common in the workplace, workers are required to be more autonomous in how they plan for their retirement; for many, the need to bolster self-directed savings makes the prospect of an early retirement seem more like a pipedream than a possibility. Though everyone has varying financial situations and future expectations, here are a few things to keep in mind when working towards your own early retirement.

Create a current household budget
Before you solidify a plan of action for retiring early, you need to take inventory of your current expenses and general spending habits. If your spending habits inhibit you from saving a sizable portion of your earnings in pre-retirement, it will be incredibly difficult to retire early. If possible, try to find ways to cut discretionary expenses and evaluate your saving habits. By developing a budget, you will put yourself in an advantageous situation. In fact, maintaining a household budget will put you in the minority of American adults; according to a Gallup poll, only one in three Americans maintain a detailed household budget.

Forecast future needs
In addition to considering how inflation will affect your budget in the future, it will be wise to also consider that certain costs, such as healthcare, will increase significantly in retirement. When calculating your needs in retirement, be sure to include rising costs and unforeseen expenses. Failure to account for increasing needs could potentially leave you short of cash at a time when you may not be physically fit enough to work the hours required to cover the shortfalls.

Stay disciplined
Cutting out your favorite guilty pleasures in order to save for the future can be difficult, especially when those around you might be going on lavish vacations and buying luxury cars. By saving your money in the meantime and remaining focused on your goal, you will significantly improve the likelihood of being able to retire early.

Consider investing
Though everyone has a different financial situation and tolerance for risk with their money, investing in the stock market has historically produced higher returns over a long timeline than keeping money in a bank. Given low interest rates on most bank accounts, a savings account may not grow your money significantly enough, especially if your retirement plan is predicated on seeing significant growth on your savings. Though investing in the stock market inherently carries risk of potential losses, investing long-term has historically proven beneficial to investors.

Work with your financial professional
In addition to personally taking measures to ensure an early retirement, remember that your trusted financial professional is dedicated to working with you to help achieve your goal. Reach out to your Guidestream Financial, Inc. professional to help you work towards achieving your dream.

Remember that past performance may not indicate future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, strategy, or product referenced directly or indirectly in this newsletter will be profitable, equal any corresponding historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. You should not assume that any information contained in this newsletter serves as the receipt of personalized investment advice. If a reader has questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed to their individual situation, they are encouraged to consult with a professional adviser.

This article was written by Advicent Solutions, an entity unrelated to Guidestream Financial, Inc.. The information contained in this article is not intended to be tax, investment, or legal advice, and it may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any tax penalties. Guidestream Financial, Inc. does not provide tax or legal advice. You are encouraged to consult with your tax advisor or attorney regarding specific tax issues. © 2014-2017 Advicent Solutions. All rights reserved.

Three Financial Myths and the Straightforward Truth

-by Mark Olson-

A myth is a popular belief that is false or unsupported.  I have observed the following three financial myths and appreciate this opportunity to highlight and counter each one.

Myth #1:   I don’t need a financial plan

The straightforward truth is everyone needs a financial plan.  A financial plan is one of the most powerful yet neglected tools available for managing your resources.

Effective planning defines what matters most.  It answers important questions and provides guidance for decision making.  Appropriate investment allocations naturally roll out of a well-crafted plan.  Byproducts of a thoughtful plan include increased understanding, harmony and a sense of peace.  Who can’t use more of those in their life?

Unfortunately, we all have behavioral tendencies that often keep us from doing what is best.  While most conscientious individuals sincerely intend to focus on the big picture and develop some type of plan in the future, the inertia of the status quo normally prevails.

To increase the probability of acting on your good intentions, get some help.  There is wisdom in listening to and taking good advice.   Identify and contact a qualified, experienced, unconflicted financial planner to begin a conversation and develop a plan.

Myth #2:   A competent investment advisor should have the insight to consistently predict the market

The straightforward truth is the most knowledgeable and sophisticated investment advisors humbly acknowledge market timing is not successful over the long term.  They allocate portfolio holdings across the broad range of asset classes.  Those asset classes include non-US developed equities, emerging market equities, US equities, real estate, fixed income and often hedge strategies plus other alternative investments.  Each of these asset classes provide different sources of return which all help capture returns and mitigate risk.

Despite the steady flow of inputs from the media regarding attention-grabbing, timing related investment tactics, disciplined asset allocation remains the wisest approach over the long term.  Thoughtful asset allocation is like the quote about democracy attributed to Winston Churchill. He stated emphatically, “Democracy is the worst form of government except for all the others.”  Asset allocation, like democracy, is far from perfect, but over the long term provides an extraordinary way to generate returns and manage risk that surpasses all the other schemes.

Myth #3:   Giving decreases wealth

The straightforward truth is giving increases wealth because true wealth is linked with well-being.

Giving is perhaps the most powerful antidote for the toxic elements of self-indulgence and self-promotion permeating our culture.   Giving is an investment that benefits the giver as much or more than the receiver.  An added dividend for true givers is a dawning awareness of contentment that develops along the way.

Unfortunately, fear and anxiety often restrict openness to giving opportunities and options.  The long-term solution for increasing the level of giving is to develop a financial plan.  The plan will help clarify values, priorities and giving potential.

Conclusion:

To better manage your resources, be a planner, invest in well allocated portfolios that flow out of your plan, and be a giver.  If you embrace those initiatives, you will never regret it and most likely will be surprised by joy along the way.

How Americans are Saving for Retirement

Recent estimates indicate that the Social Security Trust Fund will run out of its surplus in 2034. Once this occurs, program payouts are expected to be worth only about 77 percent of current benefits. Unfortunately, one-third of retirees rely on social security payments for at least 90 percent of their retirement income. With social security payouts likely headed for significant reduction, contributing to self-directed retirement accounts is more crucial than ever. Just how are Americans doing when it comes to saving for their future?

How America Saves
According to a TransAmerica Center survey, the typical American expects to retire at 67 but actually ends up retiring five years earlier than anticipated.
A shortened career means less time for earning and saving, as well as more time spent withdrawing from accounts. This further emphasizes how saving for retirement is even more crucial than some Americans might assume.

 

Remember that past performance may not indicate future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, strategy, or product referenced directly or indirectly in this newsletter will be profitable, equal any corresponding historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. You should not assume that any information contained in this newsletter serves as the receipt of personalized investment advice. If a reader has questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed to their individual situation, they are encouraged to consult with a professional adviser.

This article was written by Advicent Solutions, an entity unrelated to Guidestream Financial, Inc.. The information contained in this article is not intended to be tax, investment, or legal advice, and it may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any tax penalties. Guidestream Financial, Inc. does not provide tax or legal advice. You are encouraged to consult with your tax advisor or attorney regarding specific tax issues. © 2014-2017 Advicent Solutions. All rights reserved.

12 Common Tax Errors to Avoid

Filing taxes can be a tedious process. If you plan to do it yourself, either online or with an old-fashioned pen and paper, it can be all too easy to make mistakes. If you aren’t familiar enough with the tax code to take advantages of available tax breaks, you could lose money. Clerical errors and math mistakes can lead to tax audits, late fees and even jail time for tax fraud. Avoid the following common mistakes to ensure that you get through tax season unscathed. 

1.    Choosing the wrong filing status: Choosing the correct filing status is important because tax brackets, deductions and credits vary for each status. You may fare better filing separately even if you’re married, so make sure to calculate both scenarios before choosing a status. You should also consider filing as Head of Household if you’re single and have a dependent living with you. Your filing status is based on your status as of Dec. 31 of the filing year. 

2.    Not claiming all available deductions and credits: You could end up with a smaller refund or a larger tax liability than necessary if you fail to take advantage of the tax breaks available to you. Do your research and consider getting help from a tax preparer or software to make sure you’re not missing anything in your return.

3.    Not claiming all dependents: You probably won’t forget to claim your children as dependents, but did you know you could claim your parents, too? Anyone you support financially (adult children, elderly parents or other relatives) more than they support themselves, may be claimed as a dependent as long as they meet the requirements. Even if your parents don’t live with you, you may be able to claim them.

4.    Forgetting to claim carryover items: Some tax credits must be taken over the course of several years if they exceed certain thresholds. Common examples include charitable donations, capital losses and business write-offs. If you weren’t able to claim the entire credit in years past, make sure you’re claiming it this year.

5.    Neglecting to calculate the AMT: The Alternative Minimum Tax is a parallel tax code with its own set of rules. Taxpayers are expected to calculate their tax burden two ways, once under the regular tax code and once under the AMT’s rules. Whichever outcome is higher is the tax they owe. Many taxpayers don’t calculate their taxes under the AMT because they assume they aren’t eligible, but the number of people required to file under the AMT is increasing. If you pick the wrong tax code, the IRS could come looking for the remaining balance.

6.    Claiming the wrong credits and deductions: Make sure you actually qualify for the credits and deductions you claim. If the IRS catches on, you could face a tax audit, recalculation of your tax burden, or in extreme cases—jail time for tax evasion.

7.    Not including all sources of income: If you worked at more than one job during the year, you should have a Form W-2 for each job. You should also include applicable Form 1099 for other income sources. Missing forms or leaving out income can lead to tax audits or a delayed refund. If you inadvertently leave something out of your return, you can file a Form 1040X Amended Return.

8.    Math errors: It’s easy to make math mistakes when you’re doing your taxes by hand and flipping back and forth between forms. Double-check your math before filing, because a mistake could lose you money or get you in trouble with the IRS.

9.    Direct deposit mistakes: You can now elect to receive your tax refunds via direct deposit to your checking or saving accounts. This election can help you save money and speed the process along, but it’s also another opportunity for error. If you input the wrong routing number, your return could go to someone else or be sent back to the IRS.

10.    Forgetting to include your social security number: You must include your correct social security number in order to file a return. Failing to do so can hold up your return and subject you to late filing fees. You must also include your spouse’s social security number if you file jointly, as well as the numbers of any dependents you claim.

11.    Forgetting to sign and date your return: Your return is not valid if you don’t sign and date it. Failing to do so could also subject you to late fees and delayed refunds. To remedy this, the IRS will send out a signature card for you to sign. Speed up the process by double-checking that your signatures are present.

12.    Not including your payment: If you owe the IRS money, make sure to include what you owe when you file. If you forget, you may end up owing interest and late fees even though you had the return filed on time.

Remember that past performance may not indicate future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, strategy, or product referenced directly or indirectly in this newsletter will be profitable, equal any corresponding historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. You should not assume that any information contained in this newsletter serves as the receipt of personalized investment advice. If a reader has questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed to their individual situation, they are encouraged to consult with a professional adviser.

This article was written by Advicent Solutions, an entity unrelated to Guidestream Financial, Inc.. The information contained in this article is not intended to be tax, investment, or legal advice, and it may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any tax penalties. Guidestream Financial, Inc. does not provide tax or legal advice. You are encouraged to consult with your tax advisor or attorney regarding specific tax issues. © 2014-2017 Advicent Solutions. All rights reserved.

Year-End Financial Checklist

YEAR END FINANCIAL CHECKLIST

As we near the end of the year, it’s time to look back at what’s happened and how it will affect your financial future. Check off these important items so that you can start the new year’s finances with peace of mind.

INCOME TAX
Review your tax withholdings.
Have you had a major life change (employment change, marriage/divorce, a new child) that affects your income tax? Check to make sure your tax withholdings have been properly adjusted. Having low withholdings can lead to tax penalties, while having too high of withholdings prevents you from accessing your money until your tax return is filed.

Estimate your AGI.
Determine your adjusted gross income (AGI) with the help of your tax advisor. Your AGI will help determine your tax bracket, which you’ll need for investment and retirement planning.

Estimate your AMT.
Determine whether you will be subject to the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) and if there are ways to mitigate your AMT liability.

INVESTMENTS
Assure that your investment portfolios align with your long-term plan.
If you don’t have a plan or have questions about the alignment, contact your GuideStream Financial advisor. 

Systematically review your portfolios and rebalance when appropriate.
As a client of GuideStream Financial, we handle this step for you. We systematically review each portfolio and periodically rebalance to make any necessary adjustments. We just completed a rebalance in early November. 

RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS
If you are retired, make sure you’ve taken all necessary required minimum distributions (RMDs).
RMDs may be one of the most important items to review when going over your finances at the end of the year. Standard IRAs require these distributions be taken annually after the year you turn 70 ½; standard 401(k)s require them annually after you retire or turn 70 ½ (whichever is earlier). Failure to take an RMD will trigger a 50 percent excise tax on the value of the RMD.

Max contributions to an IRA and employer retirement plan for the year.
Both IRAs and 401(k)s have annual contribution limits. If you find you have excess savings and have not reached your annual limit, it may be a good idea to make additional contributions. Similarly, you may also consider making greater monthly contributions to your accounts next year, spreading out the cost of contribution. The deadline for IRA contributions is usually April 15 of the following year; 401(k) deadlines may be restricted to the calendar year, depending on your employer.

Consider converting a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA.
Did you have a good tax year? It may be an opportune time to convert a portion (or all) of your traditional IRA to a Roth IRA and pay your taxes at a lower rate. It is important to understand, however, that Roth accounts have contribution limits placed on them, so keeping a traditional IRA might be beneficial. Before making any changes, consider seeking the help of a professional   accountant who can help you with the conversion and calculate your new tax liability.

GIVING
Donate to charity.
In additional to the joy received by assisting causes your care about, you can lower taxable income by 50 or 30 percent with a gift to a public charity or by 30 or 20 percent with a gift to a private foundation. If your gift exceeds these limits, you can roll over the excess deduction for up to five years.

Reduce your estate through gifts.
You are permitted to give up to $14,000 ($28,000 for married couples) a year per recipient as an untaxed gift. Gifts above this value will consume part of your lifetime gift/estate tax exemption amount ($5,430,000 in 2015). If a gift directly funds education tuition or pays for qualified medical expenses, it will go untaxed no matter what the value.

FAMILY FUNDING
Check your flexible savings account (FSA).
The government only permits a $500 annual rollover in an FSA; any excess funds disappear if unused by the end of the year. If you have extra money in your FSA, you may want to schedule necessary medical or dental procedures before the end of the year.

Check your health savings account (HSA).
HSA funds don’t disappear at the end of each year like with an FSA; however, many with few medical needs discover money accumulating in their HSAs much faster than they are using it. Consider reducing your contributions to your HSA if your account has reached a comfortable amount and you know of better uses for your money.

Consider contributions to a 529 plan to fund your children’s/grandchildren’s education. 529 Plans allow for you to make contributions to a tax-free account that may be used to pay for qualifying secondary education expenses. (Investors should consider investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses associated with 529 plans before using them. Information about 529 plans is available in their issuers’ official statements.)

Remember that past performance may not indicate future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, strategy, or product referenced directly or indirectly in this newsletter will be profitable, equal any corresponding historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. You should not assume that any information contained in this newsletter serves as the receipt of personalized investment advice. If a reader has questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed to their individual situation, they are encouraged to consult with a professional adviser.

This article was written by Advicent Solutions, an entity unrelated to Guidestream Financial, Inc.. The information contained in this article is not intended to be tax, investment, or legal advice, and it may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any tax penalties. Guidestream Financial, Inc. does not provide tax or legal advice. You are encouraged to consult with your tax advisor or attorney regarding specific tax issues. © 2014-2015 Advicent Solutions. All rights reserved.

HOW TO KNOW YOU’RE INVESTED IN THE RIGHT PORTFOLIO

From time to time we come across lists and articles on investing. And we’ve taken a few of the items we’ve seen over the years and written a little commentary based on how we serve you.

A year from now, you plan to own similar investments.

We believe ‘winning’ in the market begins with understanding ‘why’ you are allocated as you are.  Timing and changing strategies rarely produce the long term results investors need to fund their retirements.  Sticking with an allocation that is rebalanced and invested with purpose is the best way to ‘Win’ in retirement.

You’re so well-diversified that you always own at least one disappointing investment.

This is probably one of the hardest lessons in investing and represents the value in diversification.  A properly diversified portfolio is always going to have some asset classes (i.e. investments) out of favor with others being the bright spots.  The key is to own them both since timing them consistently is impossible.

When the stock market is volatile, or even decreasing, you are not uncomfortable.

You realize that the stock market is volatile and the temporary declines of 14% inter-year and greater than 20% every 5 years are normal. That’s precisely why stocks return more over the long term than other less volatile investments.

For every dollar you’ve saved, you have an eventual use in mind — and you are invested accordingly.

Dollars that you have saved, but aren’t needed for many years in the future, should be invested accordingly.  The dollars needed soon should be in less volatile (i.e. lower return) investments.  However, don’t shortchange your resources the ability to outpace inflation when they are needed far into the future.

You can remember the last time you rebalanced.

Well, you might not be able to recall if you have, but the good news is that as a client of GuideStream Financial, you have your portfolio(s) rebalanced at least annually.  We help you stay true to your long term investment and retirement objectives.

You never say to yourself, “Wow, I didn’t expect that.”

This is our goal.  Through preparation and education, you understand that year to year, your portfolio will fluctuate depending on contributions, withdrawals and returns – but that in the end, you have a good working knowledge of how your cash flow will work over time.  We know you don’t like surprises and neither do we.  Some years, things may be fruitful and other years they may not be. What’s most important is that we both know the long term goals and that is where we focus.

We appreciate your continued trust and are honored to assist you on your stewardship journey. 

The Importance of Having A Will

According to a 2014 survey, 51 percent of Americans age 55-64 (and 62 percent of Americans age 45-54) don’t have a will. The reasons for not maintaining a will can range from a lack of urgency to a paralyzing fear of death. Not only is having a will necessary, the effects of dying without having a will—called dying “intestate”—may be worse than you expect.

The Dangers of Dying Intestate
Estate Shrinkage
It is normal for estates to lose some of their value to final costs, such as burial/funeral expenses and outstanding debts. However, lengthy court procedures and legal fees attributed to resolving inheritance disbursement can quickly erode a large part of an estate’s net worth. Wills are created for the benefit of survivors; not having one reduces the amount that passes to the heirs.

Family Disputes and Disagreements
Disagreements regarding an estate can easily cause rifts in families. Arguments over who deserves specific heirlooms or property can be exacerbated when the wishes of the decedent are not directly known. In extreme circumstances, these kinds of disputes can last for decades, making a will essential—especially when families are large or relationships are strained.

Drafting a Will
Inexpensive and Quick Process
Creating a will is not expensive, with some estimates putting the cost at just a few hundred dollars if done through a lawyer. Additionally, there are legal websites that allow individuals to draft their own wills at a fraction of that cost. Whichever method is used, creating a will typically takes less time to complete than most people think.

Benefits of a Will
Control over Assets
The decedent may have specific desires regarding which of their family members get their possessions. Instead of the distribution of assets being decided by another family member or possibly the legal system, having a will allows the decedent to fully control where all assets will be distributed.

Choose Executor of Will
If there is no will, and subsequently no executor named, the individual that is chosen by the probate court may not act according to the decedent’s desires. Choosing the executor of a will ensures that the individual that the decedent thinks will best serve his or her wishes will be in charge of key decisions, handling conflicts and proper care of 
the estate. 

Custody of Children
If the decedent has children, but has not named a new guardian in a will, the courts will decide who gets custody of their children. Although judges consider living situations and familial relations while trying to act in the best interest of children, they can’t possibly know every detail about each family’s unique situation and there is no guarantee that a court-appointed guardian will be the same person the decedent’s would have wanted.

Now is the Time
Peace of Mind
Thinking about death may be frightening, but the thought of leaving confusion, lack of clarity and potential disputes behind can be even more unsettling. Creating a will allows individuals to know that, when they pass away, all of their wishes will be honored and their loved ones will be free from the burden of figuring out the details of an estate.

Keep it Updated
If you already have a will, consider revisiting and, if necessary, updating it. There may have been financial, legal or personal life changes that are not yet reflected by the current version of your will. Not having a will can create confusion, but having an outdated will that gives rights to a former spouse or estranged family members can be disastrous for intended heirs.
 

_________________________

Remember that past performance may not indicate future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, strategy, or product referenced directly or indirectly in this newsletter will be profitable, equal any corresponding historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. You should not assume that any information contained in this newsletter serves as the receipt of personalized investment advice. If a reader has questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed to their individual situation, they are encouraged to consult with a professional adviser. 

This article was written by Advicent Solutions, an entity unrelated to Guidestream Financial, Inc.. The information contained in this article is not intended to be tax, investment, or legal advice, and it may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any tax penalties. Guidestream Financial, Inc. does not provide tax or legal advice. You are encouraged to consult with your tax advisor or attorney regarding specific tax issues. © 2014 Advicent Solutions. All rights reserved.

Financial Planning: Not Just for Men!

Financial Planning: Not Just for Men!

-by Debra Lyon, Caitlin Koppelman, and Lori Pelham-

Lisa is 35. She’s a mother to 2 beautiful children and a recent divorcee. She just returned to part time work last year when her youngest started school. Up until now, she’s largely left the management of family finances to her husband. Now that he’s her ex-husband, she’s faced with limited financial knowledge, heaped on top of an already stressful balance between work and family.

Lisa needs an advisor who knows her needs; someone she can trust completely. Someone who can clearly communicate financial principles to help her not only succeed, but grow in her financial literacy. In short, she needs a coach who can teach her and help her look out for her family’s financial future.

Susan is 72 and recently widowed. Her children are grown, and she’s pleased to say that she devoted her life to raising them well. She hasn’t worked since before the kids were born, and she’s always been thankful for her husband’s careful attention to their family finances. Now that he’s gone, she’s not sure who to turn to. She knows the basics of paying bills – her husband shared that much with her – but what about taxes? Long-term care needs? How does her husband’s death affect their estate plan?

­­­­Susan needs an advisor who recognizes her situation and knows the unique needs that come with it. The ideal advisor for Susan would be able to look at the whole picture of her financial situation – appreciate and honor what her husband has put in place – and help Susan move forward toward the future with confidence.

These are just two examples of women and their unique financial needs. Even if you’re currently married and/or part of a dual-income household, as a woman you have specific financial thoughts and convictions that may be different from your husband’s. While you’re working together toward a shared future, it’s important you continue to take an active role in the management of family finances.

Women are earning more and spending more than ever. They control more dollars in the US economy today than in any other time in history. Any financial advisor worth their fee should recognize this fact and (more importantly!) recognize the unique needs of the women in his/her client base.

Find yourself a financial coach. Maybe you already have one, but you don’t usually go to the annual review meetings with your spouse. We encourage you to go: build a relationship with your advisor. If you have shared finances, that coach should be looking out for you, too.

If you’re on your own, like Lisa or Susan, seek out the counsel of an advisor. If it helps, look for a woman whose professional opinion you trust. Even if her personal situation is different from yours, you still have some major things in common.

Don’t leave your financial future to chance. Find an advisor you can trust, a coach who can help you navigate the twists and turns of life. That relationship will prove fruitful now and in the future.  

 

Keeping Up With the Joneses

People like to fit in; it’s one of the simplest laws of human nature. Although we value the things that make us unique, most of us are careful to not let them make us social outsiders. There is strength in numbers, and conformity reassures us that we are making the right decisions.

Unfortunately, comparing ourselves to others can lead to real problems. Our egos can become sensitive—even irrational—when trying to protect the public image of our wealth and status. If left unchecked, the fear of falling behind our peers can destroy our financial security. 

Meet the Neighbors
In a paper published by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, economists tested and analyzed the social behavior of “keeping up with the Joneses” and the impact it could have on personal finances.

In their study, economists used six-digit postal codes to divide Canadian cities into micro-neighborhoods (13 households on average). They then observed financial changes in the neighborhoods after one of the households had won a lottery prize.

Whereas many researchers have documented the Sudden Wealth Syndrome of lottery winners (many of whom end up in financial ruin), this study instead focused on the winners’ closest neighbors. The researchers wanted to know how people responded when someone else suddenly had more money to spend. 

The results were clear: for every 1,000 Canadian dollar increase in the size of the lottery prize, the number of bankruptcy filings among close neighbors increased 2.4 percent in the three years following the lottery win (the base rate was .46 bankruptcies per neighborhood). This effect was greater in low-income neighborhoods where prize values were higher relative to average incomes.

What happened? When the asset sheets of the bankrupt neighbors were reviewed, researchers found that the houses had increased their “conspicuous consumption,” 

spending more of their money on visible signs of wealth (rather than investments that go unseen). Accordingly, the ratio of visible to invisible assets rose with the size of the lottery winnings, suggesting that individuals were willing to spend more when their “Joneses” had won more.

Irrational Groupthink

While the study may simply confirm what many might have suspected, the irrationality of the situation is striking. Winning a lottery is not a reward or promotion—it says nothing about a person’s value or rank. Why would neighbors, who know the wealth was won by luck, compare themselves to a situation they can’t possibly copy? Furthermore, why try to emulate the neighborhood’s one winner, when “fitting in” should mean behaving like all the other non-winning households?

The problem is that wealth and status are relative each person. Everyone has his or her own “Joneses.” When one house receives a windfall of cash and begins spending, it can set off a chain reaction. Our egos would rather let us spend too much than risk falling behind.

This arms race mentality is why the housing bubble of the last decade became so severe. It wasn’t just the opportunity to make money off real estate; it was the visibility of the changing wealth. Every day, people watched their neighbors buy and improve properties, knowing that they would have to do the same just to maintain the status quo.

Forgetting About the Joneses

A little social pressure isn’t necessarily a bad thing. It often provides a nudge towards positive action and helps us make good choices. But when it comes to money habits, trying to match (or exceed) those around you can lead to serious problems. Everyone’s financial situation is unique, and each person defines success differently. As difficult as it is, you need to shut out the social noise and ignore what others do with their money. After all, you’re trying to accomplish your financial goals—not theirs.

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Remember that past performance may not indicate future results. Different types of investments involve varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, strategy, or product referenced directly or indirectly in this newsletter will be profitable, equal any corresponding historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful. You should not assume that any information contained in this newsletter serves as the receipt of personalized investment advice. If a reader has questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed to their individual situation, they are encouraged to consult with a professional adviser. 

This article was written by Advicent Solutions, an entity unrelated to Guidestream Financial, Inc.. The information contained in this article is not intended to be tax, investment, or legal advice, and it may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any tax penalties. Guidestream Financial, Inc. does not provide tax or legal advice. You are encouraged to consult with your tax advisor or attorney regarding specific tax issues. © 2014 Advicent Solutions. All rights reserved.

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